gazpachuelo

Gazpachuelo – Sophistication itself

Now that regional Spanish food has become updated and fashionable and is often cooked by top chefs, it is worthwhile looking for good recipes, which more often than not are unknown outside their locality. 

This is the case of Gazpachuelo, a classic recipe from Málaga.

On our way to Gaucín, a beautiful village  up in the Serranía de Ronda to launch my latest book  ‘ Delicioso, a History of Food in Spain’, my husband and I decided to stop in  Malaga. I was looking for Gazpachuelo an intriguing local recipe I had mentioned in the book.  Gazpachuelo  belongs to the family of the Gazpachos or more precisely the white Andalusian gazpachos which normally are served cold and are made with almonds, which is not the case here. 

Discover Gazpachuelo

Gazpachuelo is a warm soup made traditionally with water, a spoonful or two of fresh home- made mayonnaise (or better said salsa mahonesa) and the egg whites left from making the sauce. This time I was looking for a richer fish and shellfish version but cooked without the egg whites, a recipe that I tasted many years ago. 

Get my new book

A History of The Food in Spain

This is the first book in English to trace the History of the Food of Spain from antiquity to the present day. 

 

 

For the purpose I looked for different versions included in Enrique Mapelli’s excellent book Papeles de Gastronomía Malagueña but in the end I decided to follow a recipe I enjoyed at Meson Antonio, a popular restaurant situated in the old quarter of Málaga.

Back in London I decided to serve Gazpachuelo at a dinner party with friends.

At Meson Antonio we also tasted the ensalada malagueña, another exceptional dish made with salted cod ( desalted and finely shredded), potatoes and fresh oranges dressed with the fruitiest olive oil money can buy and a dash or two of Sherry vinegar.

Back in London I decided to serve Gazpachuelo at a dinner party with friends. 

 

Get the First Book in English to trace the History of the Food of Spain

Trace the Food of Spain from Antiquity to the Present Day.
Get this Masterpiece now!

Gazpachuelo

Start the recipe by making the mahonesa sauce and a delicate but tasty fish stock.

  To serve 2 people 

To make mahonesa, traditional cooks use virgin olive oil but I prefer a blend of virgin olive oil and sunflower oil which is less strong.

gazpachuelo

Ingredients

2 egg yolks

Sea salt

100 g. sunflower oil

20 g. virgin olive oil

Salt

white pepper to taste (optional)

 Lemon juice or vinegar to taste

A few drops warm water

In a deep bowl whisk the egg yolks and a little salt until well blended. 
Add the pepper. 

Using a jug start adding, little by little, first the sunflower oil and then the olive oil whisking constantly at a moderate speed. As it takes quite some time, whisk in both directions and change hands if needed.  

When ready adjust the seasoning adding a few drops of warm water, the lemon juice or the vinegar to taste. 

The emulsion will become slightly lighter and creamier. 

Reserve at room temperature.

Get the First Book in English to trace the History of the Food of Spain

Trace the Food of Spain from Antiquity to the Present Day.
Get this Masterpiece now!

Tags: No tags

Add a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *